Curriculum Information by Subject

Science

Science

Science

Key stage 3
Yr7 Assessment
Yr8 Assessment
Key Stage 4
Yr11 Assessment
Key Stage 5 - Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Key stage 3

Year 7:

Year 7 follows a range of topics arranged into four blocks throughout the year, with each block containing a Biology (except Block 1), Chemistry and Physics topic:

  Block 1 Block 2 Block 3 Block 4
Biology Working in Science Cells Body Systems Reproduction
Chemistry Particles Elements and Compounds Reactions Acids and Alkalis
Physics Forces Sound Light Space

Each topic is between six to nine lessons in length and is assessed with a topic assessment in which a Learner Stage is given to students for the content and quality of their work.  The topic assessments include a range of tasks, with some being poster/presentation based, some modelling activities and some written assessments.  Each block is then also assessed by an end of topic test which is done as a written test.

A range of Teaching and Learning styles are used across the topics and there is opportunity for teacher-led lessons, as well as independent learning tasks throughout the year, varying from topic-to-topic.  In addition, depending on the topic being studied, the hope is to complete practical work in between a half to a third of all Science lessons.

The “Reproduction” topic is timed at the end of the academic year to coincide with the RE department’s work on relationships and includes our work on sex education.  A copy of this topic can be accessed at any time in the main school office, including the resources that will be used.

Year 8:

Year 8 builds on scientific ideas already developed in Year 7, going into more detail about the applications of Science already covered.  The topics are arranged into four blocks throughout the year, with each block containing a Biology, Chemistry and Physics topic:

  Block 1 Block 2 Block 3 Block 4
Biology Health and Lifestyle Ecosystem Processes Adaptation and Inheritance Reproduction
Chemistry Periodic Table Separation Techniques Metals and Acids The Earth
Physics Electricity and Magnetism Energy Motion and Pressure

Each topic is between six to nine lessons in length and is assessed with a topic assessment in which a level is given to students for the content and quality of their work.  The topic assessments include a range of tasks, with some being poster/presentation based, some modelling activities and some written assessments.  Each block is then also assessed by an end of topic test which is done as a written test.

A range of Teaching and Learning styles are used across the topics and there is opportunity for teacher-led lessons, as well as independent learning tasks throughout the year, varying from topic-to-topic.  In addition, depending on the topic being studied, the hope is to complete practical work in between a half to a third of all Science lessons.

The “Reproduction” topic is timed at the end of the academic year to coincide with the RE department’s work on relationships and includes our work on sex education.  A copy of this topic can be accessed at any time in the main school office, including the resources that will be used.

Key Stage 4

THIS INFORMATION IS ONLY CORRECT FOR STUDENTS STARTING YEAR 9 OR YEAR 10 IN SEPTEMBER 2016

All students in Years 9/10/11 follow GCSE Double (Combined) or Triple (Separate) Science.  Year 9 learners work towards the first units of their GCSE.  They are not split into Combined or Separate Science until towards the end of Year 9.  In Years 10 and 11 students are split into Combined or Separate Science, the difference being that students doing Separate Sciences cover an extra couple of topics and go into more detail in each of the topics, although they have the same number of lessons as students doing Combined Sciences.  Students no longer complete Controlled Assessment for their Sciences, instead there are a list of “required practicals” that they need to cover in lessons, which could be assessed in their exams.

Combined Science – students follow topics in Biology, Chemistry and Physics and sit combined Science exams at the end of Year 11 to be awarded 2 GCSEs in Science.  Combined Science allows students more time to consolidate their understanding, which we hope will enable them to achieve higher grades. Both GCSEs offer grades from 9 to 1 but students may be entered for Higher or Foundation Tier depending on their progress. This pathway still allows progression to A Level in the sciences.

Separate Science – students follow topics in Biology, Chemistry and Physics and sit separate Science exams at the end of Year 11 to be awarded 3 GCSEs in Science, one each in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.  It offers the full range of grades from 9 to 1. All three GCSEs require a good understanding of the abstract ideas in science from Year 10 onwards. All three GCSEs contain a blend of science for citizenship, application of science and abstract science theories. Triple Science requires a real commitment to study because of the demands of taking three GCSEs in the time normally allocated to two.

Year Biology Topics Chemistry Topics Physics Topics
9 Cell Biology

Organisation

Atomic Structure

Bonding

Atmosphere

Forces in Motion

Waves

Energy (Part 1)

10 Infection and Response

Bioenergetics

Homeostasis and Response

Chemical Changes

Energy Changes

The Rate and Extent of Chemical Change

Chemical Analysis

Electricity

Electromagnetic Spectrum

Forces

Particles

Energy (Part 2)

11 Inheritance, Variation and Evolution

Ecology

Quantitative Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

Using resources

Atom Structure Magnetism and Electromagnetism

Forces

Space (Separate Science Only)

 

 

THIS INFORMATION IS ONLY CORRECT FOR STUDENTS STARTING YEAR 11 IN SEPTEMBER 2016

Pathway 1 (Triple Science):

Many students will follow the Triple Science pathway, culminating in three GCSEs in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. It offers the full range of grades from A* to G. All three GCSEs require a good understanding of the abstract ideas in science from Year 10 onwards. All three GCSEs contain a blend of science for citizenship, application of science and abstract science theories. Triple Science requires a real commitment to study because of the demands of taking three GCSEs in the time normally allocated to two.

Students will also complete a piece of practical Controlled Assessment this year for each of their separate Sciences, which is worth 25% of the overall Biology, Chemistry or Physics grade respectively.

Students following the Triple Science pathway will be sitting 9 Science exams in the Summer (dates from the exam board to be confirmed):

Biology Chemistry Physics
Exam 1

for each subject

B1/2/3 C1/2/3 P1/2/3
Exam 2

for each subject

B4/5/6 C4/5/6 P4/5/6
Exam 3

for each subject

B7 C7 P7

Pathway 2 (Core and Additional):

Students on this pathway will have sat their Core Science in Year 10.  The Additional Science in Year 11 allows students more time to consolidate their understanding and to complete their single piece of Controlled Assessment, which will enable them to achieve higher grades. Students doing both Core and Additional Science can attain grades from A* to G, but students may be entered for Higher or Foundation Tier depending on their progress. This pathway can still allow progression to A Level in the sciences.

Students will also complete a single piece of practical Controlled Assessment this year which is worth 25% of the overall Additional Science grade.

Students following the Additional Science pathway will have already done 3 exams last year and, as such, only have 3 Science exams this Summer (dates from the exam board to be confirmed):

Biology Chemistry Physics
Exam for each subject B4/5/6 C4/5/6 P4/5/6

Yr11 Assessment

Please click the link below to access the COMBINED SCIENCES Personal Learner Checklists:

Personal Learner Checklist – Biology – COMBINED

Personal Learner Checklist – Chemistry – COMBINED

Personal Learner Checklist – Physics – COMBINED

 

Please click the link below the access the SEPARATE SCIENCES Personal Learner Checklists:

Personal Learner Checklist – Biology – SEPARATE

Personal Learner Checklist – Chemistry – SEPARATE

Personal Learner Checklist – Physics – SEPARATE

 

 

Key Stage 5 - Biology, Chemistry and Physics

AS and A2 (Exam Board: AQA)

Biology

AS Level:

Unit 1 – Biological molecules

All life on Earth shares a common chemistry.  Despite their great variety, the cells of all living organisms contain only a few groups of carbon-based compounds that interact in similar ways. This unit looks in detail at the structures and properties of carbohydrate, lipids, proteins and water.

Unit 2 – Cells

All life on Earth exists as cells. These have basic features in common. Differences between cells are due to the addition of extra features.  This unit looks at the similarities and differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, as well as how cells replicate through mitosis and meiosis.   Aspects of the immune system and the behavior of its cells are also looked at.

Unit 3 – Organisms exchange substances with their environment

The internal environment of a cell or organism is different from its external environment. The exchange of substances between internal and external environments takes place at exchange surfaces. To enter or leave an organism, most substances must cross cell membranes.  This unit looks at the way in which transport of substances takes place in organisms in a range of contexts.

Unit 4 – Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms

Biological diversity – biodiversity – is reflected in the vast number of species of organisms, in the variation of individual characteristics within a single species and in the variation of cell types within a single multicellular organism.  This unit looks at how differences between individuals within a species could be the result of genetic factors, of environmental factors, or a combination of both, with a detailed look at genetics.

A Level:

Unit 5 – Energy transfers in and between organisms

Life depends on continuous transfers of energy.  This topic focuses on what energy is in the biological sense, and how this is used in a range of contexts, including in photosynthesis, respiration and in biomass.

Unit 6 – Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments

A stimulus is a change in the internal or external environment. A receptor detects a stimulus. A coordinator formulates a suitable response to a stimulus. An effector produces a response.  This topic looks at how this happens, including comparisons between mammalian and plant responses.

Unit 7 – Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems

The theory of evolution underpins modern Biology. All new species arise from an existing species. This results in different species sharing a common ancestry, as represented in phylogenetic classification. This topic looks at the processes of evolution at both the macro and micro levels, including the impact of competing species and natural selection.

Unit 8 – The control of gene expression

Cells are able to control their metabolic activities by regulating the transcription and translation of their genome.  This topic looks at the transcription and translation of genes and how this impacts on the specialisation and function of cells. There is also a look at common ailments resulting from a breakdown of these control mechanisms and the use of DNA technology in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases.

Chemistry

Chemistry is split into 3 main areas, Physical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry.  All of these areas are covered in depth at AS Level, with further application of the key ideas at A2 Level.

AS Level:

The key components of Physical Chemistry covered at AS Level are:

Atomic structure

Amount of substance

Bonding

Energetics

Kinetics

Chemical equilibria, Le Chatelier’s principle and Kc

Oxidation, reduction and redox equations

 

The key components of Organic Chemistry covered at AS Level are:

Inorganic chemistry 3.2.1 Periodicity

Group 2, the alkaline earth metals

Group 7, the halogens

 

The key components of Inorganic Chemistry covered at AS Level are:

Introduction to organic chemistry

Alkanes

Halogenoalkanes

Alkenes

Alcohols

Organic analysis

 

A Level:

The key components of Physical Chemistry covered at A2 Level are:

Thermodynamics

Rate equations

Equilibrium constant Kp for homogeneous systems

Electrode potentials and electrochemical cells

Acids and bases

 

The key components of Organic Chemistry covered at A2 Level are:

Properties of Period 3 elements and their oxides

Transition metals

Reactions of ions in aqueous solution

 

The key components of Inorganic Chemistry covered at A2 Level are:

Optical isomerism

Aldehydes and ketones

Carboxylic acids and derivatives

Aromatic chemistry

Amines

Polymers

Amino acids, proteins and DNA

Organic synthesis

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Chromatography

Physics

Physics is split into several main areas, which are covered in depth at AS Level, with further application of the key ideas at A2 Level.

AS Level:

Mechanics

Mathematical skills developed in this topic include plotting two variables from experimental data, calculating rate of change from a graph showing a linear relationship, drawing and using the slope of a tangent to a curve as a measure of rate of change and distinguishing between instantaneous rate of change and average rate of change whilst identifying uncertainties in measurements.

Electric circuits

Students will carry out a range of practical experiments related to this topic, including estimating power output of an electric motor, using a digital voltmeter to investigate the output of a potential divider and investigating current/voltage graphs for a filament bulb, thermistor and diode.

This topic will be studied using applications that relate to a range of contexts, for example space technology.

Materials

Students will meet a range of applications of materials throughout this topic, such as viscosity, Hooke’s law and Young modulus.

Waves and the particle nature of light

Practical work covered in this unit includes determining the refractive index of solids and liquids, measuring the focal length of a lens, and using models of structures to investigate stress concentrations.

 

A Level:

Further mechanics

Building on mechanics ideas studied in Year 12, students will use a variety of technologies to analyse data from practicals in this topic, the content of which includes investigating the effect of mass, velocity and radius of orbit on centripetal force.

Electric and magnetic fields

Based on the electric circuits topic in Year 12, ideas around electric and magnetic fields are developed to include using a coulomb meter to measure charge stored and using an electronic balance to measure the force between two charges.

Nuclear and particle physics

Relating ideas from the electric and magnetic fields topic, students will study aspects of how electrons are released in the process of thermionic emission and how they can be accelerated by electric and magnetic fields, as well as the role of electric and magnetic fields in particle accelerators and detectors.

Thermodynamics

Students will complete a range of practical experiments related to this topic, including investigating the relationship between the volume and temperature of a fixed mass of gas.

Space

Ideas in this topic will build on how the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram relates stellar luminosity to surface temperature, and to the life cycle of stars.

Nuclear radiation

The processes of nuclear fusion and fission will be covered in this topic, as well as practical work that enables students to measuring the half-life of a radioactive material.

Gravitational fields

Students will explore Newton’s laws of motion and universal gravitation and will learn to apply these in a range of contexts.

Oscillations

This topic allows students to understand the distinction between free and forced oscillations, as well as measuring gravitational field strength using a simple pendulum and measuring a spring constant from simple harmonic motion.